Influence of Continuous Speaking on Ventilation This study was conducted to explore the influence of speaking on ventilation. Twenty healthy young men were studied during periods of quiet breathing and prolonged speaking using noninvasive methods to measure chest wall surface motions and expired gas composition. Results indicated that all subjects ventilated more during speaking than during ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2000
Influence of Continuous Speaking on Ventilation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders and Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences The University of Arizona Tucson
  • Heather L. Lohmeier
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders and Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences The University of Arizona Tucson
  • Contact author: Jeannette D. Hoit, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, PO. Box 210071, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. Email: hoit@u.arizona.edu
    Contact author: Jeannette D. Hoit, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, PO. Box 210071, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721. Email: hoit@u.arizona.edu×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: hoit@u.arizona.edu
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2000
Influence of Continuous Speaking on Ventilation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2000, Vol. 43, 1240-1251. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4305.1240
History: Received June 4, 1999 , Accepted February 17, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2000, Vol. 43, 1240-1251. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4305.1240
History: Received June 4, 1999; Accepted February 17, 2000

This study was conducted to explore the influence of speaking on ventilation. Twenty healthy young men were studied during periods of quiet breathing and prolonged speaking using noninvasive methods to measure chest wall surface motions and expired gas composition. Results indicated that all subjects ventilated more during speaking than during quiet breathing, usually by augmenting both tidal volume and breathing frequency. Ventilation did not change across repeated speaking trials. Quiet breathing was altered from its usual behavior following speaking, often for several minutes. Speaking-related increases in ventilation were found to be strongly correlated with lung volume expenditures per syllable. These findings have clinical implications for the respiratory care practitioner and the speech-language pathologist.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported, in part, by James A. Shannon Director's Award (DC-02501), National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grant (DC-01409), and Research Grant (DC-03425) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors wish to thank Nicole Engel whose pilot work laid the foundation for this research and Fiona Bailey, Carol Boliek, DiAnne Gagliardo, Wolfgang Golser, Thomas Hixon, Jennifer McKee, Meridith Needleman, Lori Scheer, and Peter Watson for their valuable assistance. We also thank Steven Shea for his important conceptual contributions to this work.
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