Lip Muscle Activity Related to Speech Rate and Loudness Changes in suprasegmental speech parameters may require adjustments in oral motor control that are reflected in the activity of perioral musculature. In order to evaluate possible patterns of difference, perioral surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were obtained from 20 adults who read a paragraph aloud at habitual rate and at self-judged ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2000
Lip Muscle Activity Related to Speech Rate and Loudness
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy B. Wohlert
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Vicki L. Hammen
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Amy B. Wohlert, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of New Mexico, 901 Vassar NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131.
    Contact author: Amy B. Wohlert, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of New Mexico, 901 Vassar NE, Albuquerque, NM 87131.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: awohlert@unm.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
    Currently affiliated with the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque×
  • Currently affiliated with St. Vincent’s Hospital, Indianapolis, IN
    Currently affiliated with St. Vincent’s Hospital, Indianapolis, IN×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2000
Lip Muscle Activity Related to Speech Rate and Loudness
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2000, Vol. 43, 1229-1239. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4305.1229
History: Received July 28, 1999 , Accepted February 16, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2000, Vol. 43, 1229-1239. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4305.1229
History: Received July 28, 1999; Accepted February 16, 2000

Changes in suprasegmental speech parameters may require adjustments in oral motor control that are reflected in the activity of perioral musculature. In order to evaluate possible patterns of difference, perioral surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were obtained from 20 adults who read a paragraph aloud at habitual rate and at self-judged proportionately slower and faster rates, at habitual loudness and at proportionately softer and louder levels, and in a "precise" manner. EMG amplitude analysis showed significant task effects, with higher average amplitudes for fast, loud, and precise speech and lower average amplitudes for slow and soft speech. These results are compatible with a model of multidimensional reorganization of speech motor control for suprasegmental changes applied to connected speech.

Acknowledgments
We appreciate the assistance of Susannah A. Cloyd and also that of Cory Armstrong, Kathy Beal, Terra Blessinger, Michelle Coleman, Elsa Hittle, Josh Kopf, Shelley Lundberg, and Laura Rutkowski in testing participants and in data analysis.
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