Directiveness in Teachers' Language Input to Toddlers and Preschoolers in Day Care Five subtypes of directiveness were examined in the interactions of day care teachers with toddler and preschooler groups. The instructional context (book reading, play dough) yielded significant differences across all five subtypes of directiveness, indicating that these two activities elicited different types of teacher-child discourse. Book reading was characterized by ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2000
Directiveness in Teachers' Language Input to Toddlers and Preschoolers in Day Care
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Luigi Girolametto
    University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Elaine Weitzman
    The Hanen Centre Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Riet van Lieshout
    University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Dawna Duff
    University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Contact author: Luigi Girolametto, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, 6 Queen's Park Crescent West, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3H2. Email: l.girolametto@utoronto.ca
    Contact author: Luigi Girolametto, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, 6 Queen's Park Crescent West, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3H2. Email: l.girolametto@utoronto.ca×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: l.girolametto@utoronto.ca
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2000
Directiveness in Teachers' Language Input to Toddlers and Preschoolers in Day Care
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2000, Vol. 43, 1101-1114. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4305.1101
History: Received January 11, 2000 , Accepted June 28, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2000, Vol. 43, 1101-1114. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4305.1101
History: Received January 11, 2000; Accepted June 28, 2000

Five subtypes of directiveness were examined in the interactions of day care teachers with toddler and preschooler groups. The instructional context (book reading, play dough) yielded significant differences across all five subtypes of directiveness, indicating that these two activities elicited different types of teacher-child discourse. Book reading was characterized by significantly more behavior and response control and less conversation control in comparison with the playdough activity. Correlations between teachers' directiveness and child language productivity indicated that behavior control and turn-taking control were associated with low levels of productivity, whereas conversation control was associated with the highest levels of productivity. The results of this study confirm that instructional context is an important mediator of teachers' directiveness and suggest that subtypes of directiveness have differential effects on child language output.

Acknowledgments
This study was sponsored by a grant from Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. We thank Sophie Kaegi and Megan Wiigs, research assistants, for their help with data transcription and data entry. We are grateful to Lisa Hoaken, speech-language pathologist, for her assistance in subject recruitment and data collection. Above all, we are deeply appreciative of the participation of the teachers and the children.
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