A Comparison of Equal-Appearing Interval Scaling and Direct Magnitude Estimation of Nasal Voice Quality Listeners rated the nasality of synthesized vowels using two psychophysical scaling methods (equal-appearing interval scaling and direct magnitude estimation). A curvilinear relationship between equal-appearing interval ratings and direct magnitude estimations of nasality indicated that nasality is a prothetic rather than metathetic dimension. It also was shown that the use of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2000
A Comparison of Equal-Appearing Interval Scaling and Direct Magnitude Estimation of Nasal Voice Quality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard I. Zraick
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock, AR
  • Julie M. Liss
    Arizona State University Tempe, AZ
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2000
A Comparison of Equal-Appearing Interval Scaling and Direct Magnitude Estimation of Nasal Voice Quality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2000, Vol. 43, 979-988. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4304.979
History: Received April 30, 1999 , Accepted December 14, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2000, Vol. 43, 979-988. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4304.979
History: Received April 30, 1999; Accepted December 14, 1999

Listeners rated the nasality of synthesized vowels using two psychophysical scaling methods (equal-appearing interval scaling and direct magnitude estimation). A curvilinear relationship between equal-appearing interval ratings and direct magnitude estimations of nasality indicated that nasality is a prothetic rather than metathetic dimension. It also was shown that the use of direct magnitude estimation results in nasality ratings that are more consistent and reliable. The results of this experiment are discussed in relation to other studies that have examined the validity and reliability of equal-appearing interval scaling of voice quality. Additionally, there is a discussion of methodological issues for future research and the implications of the findings for clinical and research purposes.

Acknowledgements
This paper is based in part on a doctoral dissertation completed by the first author while at Arizona State University, under the direction of the second author. Thanks to dissertation committee members Leonard LaPointe, James Case, Michael Dorman, and Stephen Beals. Thanks also for statistical consulting to Levent Dumenci of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Lastly, we would like to thank the student clinicians at Arizona State University who participated in the listening tasks.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access