Binaural Speech Recognition and the Stenger Effect The present investigation examined the effects of systematically altering the balance between speech presentation levels to the 2 ears of 12 listeners with bilateral asymmetrical sensorineural hearing impairments. Speech-recognition scores for /VCV/ speech stimuli were obtained from each participant in quiet for 9 conditions ranging from monaural poorer ear only ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2000
Binaural Speech Recognition and the Stenger Effect
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sue A. Karsten
    University of Iowa Iowa City, IA
  • Christopher W. Turner
    University of Iowa Iowa City, IA
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2000
Binaural Speech Recognition and the Stenger Effect
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2000, Vol. 43, 926-933. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4304.926
History: Received September 27, 1999 , Accepted March 15, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2000, Vol. 43, 926-933. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4304.926
History: Received September 27, 1999; Accepted March 15, 2000

The present investigation examined the effects of systematically altering the balance between speech presentation levels to the 2 ears of 12 listeners with bilateral asymmetrical sensorineural hearing impairments. Speech-recognition scores for /VCV/ speech stimuli were obtained from each participant in quiet for 9 conditions ranging from monaural poorer ear only to monaural better ear only, with 7 intermediate conditions in which the sound balance between ears was varied in 5-dB steps. High-pass spectral shaping was provided to the poorer ear, and unshaped amplification was provided to the better ear. The results suggested that, as a group, varying the sound level in the better ear within –20 to +10 dB of the centered position did not significantly change the speech recognition for these participants. No evidence of binaural interference was obtained. Findings also showed that in binaural listening situations, the Stenger effect has little influence upon speech-recognition scores. Even when the listeners were unaware of speech being presented to the better ear, their speech-recognition score reflected the better ear's abilities.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NIDCD Grant 2 R01 DC00377-12 and The University of Iowa, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology Sherman Scholar Honors Program. The authors would like to thank Bom Jun Kwon and Maureen Mehr for their helpful comments on an earlier draft of this article and the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Iowa City for their assistance in recruiting participants. This research was conducted as an Undergraduate Honors Thesis by the first author.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access