Effects of Methylphenidate (Ritalin) on Auditory Performance in Children With Attention and Auditory Processing Disorders A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was used to investigate the effects of methylphenidate (Ritalin) on tests of auditory processing in children diagnosed with both Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD). Thirty-two subjects received three Central Auditory Processing (CAP) tests and the Auditory Continuous Performance Test (ACPT), ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2000
Effects of Methylphenidate (Ritalin) on Auditory Performance in Children With Attention and Auditory Processing Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kim L. Tillery
    State University of New York College at Fredonia
  • Jack Katz
    State University of New York at Buffalo
  • Warren D. Keller
    East Amherst Psychology Group East Amherst, NY
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: tillery@fredonia.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2000
Effects of Methylphenidate (Ritalin) on Auditory Performance in Children With Attention and Auditory Processing Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2000, Vol. 43, 893-901. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4304.893
History: Received April 26, 1999 , Accepted December 21, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2000, Vol. 43, 893-901. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4304.893
History: Received April 26, 1999; Accepted December 21, 1999

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study was used to investigate the effects of methylphenidate (Ritalin) on tests of auditory processing in children diagnosed with both Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD). Thirty-two subjects received three Central Auditory Processing (CAP) tests and the Auditory Continuous Performance Test (ACPT), a measure of attention/impulsivity, at two separate test sessions: once when medicated with Ritalin and once when nonmedicated (placebo). Sixteen subjects were assigned randomly to receive their medication first and 16 to receive the placebo first. A counterbalanced 2x2 mixed factorial analysis of variance was conducted for each of the four dependent variables: Staggered Spondaic Word (SSW), Phonemic Synthesis (PS), Speech-in-Noise (SN), and ACPT measures. Analyses revealed that Ritalin did not have a significant effect on any of the three CAP measures. However, ACPT performance was significantly better (p<.000) for the Ritalin versus placebo condition.

Acknowledgments
The Mark Diamond Research Grant at State University of New York at Buffalo supported this work. This project was undertaken by the first author to partially fulfill the requirements for a doctoral dissertation at State University of New York at Buffalo. The second author served as advisor. The third author served as advisor and referred the participants. The authors thank Chad Swenson, Registered Pharmacist, for supplying placebo and Ritalin capsules in a professional and timely manner; Marty Howard and Lisa Walker for maintaining blindness; and Dr. Sandra McFadden for assistance with statistical analysis. The results of this study were presented at the 11th Annual American Academy of Audiology (AAA) Convention in Miami, FL; the 10th International Conference for Children and Adults with A.D.H.D. (C.H.A.D.D.S) in New York; and the 1999 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Annual Convention in San Francisco, CA.
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