Swallowing and Tongue Function Following Treatment for Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer This study examined tongue function and its relation to swallowing in 13 subjects with oral or oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy ± chemotherapy and 13 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Measures of swallowing and tongue function were obtained using videofluoroscopy, pretreatment and 2 months posttreatment. Maximum isometric strength and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2000
Swallowing and Tongue Function Following Treatment for Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cathy L. Lazarus
    Voice, Speech and Language Service and Swallowing Center Northwestern University Medical School Chicago, IL Veterans Administration Lakeside Medical Center, Chicago, IL
  • Jeri A. Logemann
    Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Barbara Roa Pauloski
    Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Alfred W. Rademaker
    The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center Biostatistics Section Northwestern University Medical School Chicago, IL
  • Charles R. Larson
    Northwestern University Evanston, IL
  • Bharat B. Mittal
    Section of Radiation Oncology Northwestern University Chicago, IL
  • Margaret Pierce
    Section of Radiation Oncology Northwestern University Chicago, IL
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: claz@northwestern.edu
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2000
Swallowing and Tongue Function Following Treatment for Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2000, Vol. 43, 1011-1023. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4304.1011
History: Received July 28, 1999 , Accepted January 7, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2000, Vol. 43, 1011-1023. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4304.1011
History: Received July 28, 1999; Accepted January 7, 2000

This study examined tongue function and its relation to swallowing in 13 subjects with oral or oropharyngeal cancer treated with primary radiotherapy ± chemotherapy and 13 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Measures of swallowing and tongue function were obtained using videofluoroscopy, pretreatment and 2 months posttreatment. Maximum isometric strength and endurance at 50% of maximum strength were obtained with the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI). Control subjects were tested once. All subjects with head and neck cancer were evaluated pretreatment and 2 months posttreatment. No significant differences were found for the tongue function measures pre- and 2 months posttreatment in the group with head and neck cancer. Significantly higher tongue strength was observed in the control than in the group with head and neck cancer both pre- and posttreatment. No significant differences were found for the 2 groups for tongue endurance measures. Significant correlations of tongue strength and endurance and some swallow measures were found pre- and posttreatment for the group with head and neck cancer and for the control group. These correlations included oral and pharyngeal temporal swallow measures and oropharyngeal swallow efficiency. Pretreatment differences between the 2 groups in tongue strength were likely related to tumor bulk, pain, and soreness. Two-month posttreatment differences were likely related to radiation ± chemotherapy changes to the oral and pharyngeal mucosa. This study provides support for the hypothesis that tongue strength plays a role in oropharyngeal swallowing, particularly related to the oral phase of the swallow.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NIH/NCI Grant #PO1CA40007 and a Northwestern Memorial Foundation grant. The authors wish to thank Maggie Miller, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, for her contributions to this study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access