Frequency-Importance and Transfer Functions for Recorded CID W-22 Word Lists Frequency-importance and transfer functions for the Technisonic Studios’ recordings of the CID W-22 word test are reported. These functions may be used to calculate Articulation Index (Al) values or to predict scores on the W-22 test. The functions were derived from the word recognition scores of 8 normal-hearing listeners who ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
Frequency-Importance and Transfer Functions for Recorded CID W-22 Word Lists
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gerald A. Studebaker
    Memphis State University
  • Robert L. Sherbecoe
    Memphis State University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Gerald A. Studebaker, Ph.D., Memphis Speech and Hearing Center, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105.
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
Frequency-Importance and Transfer Functions for Recorded CID W-22 Word Lists
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 427-438. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.427
History: Received May 1, 1990 , Accepted August 27, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 427-438. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.427
History: Received May 1, 1990; Accepted August 27, 1990

Frequency-importance and transfer functions for the Technisonic Studios’ recordings of the CID W-22 word test are reported. These functions may be used to calculate Articulation Index (Al) values or to predict scores on the W-22 test. The functions were derived from the word recognition scores of 8 normal-hearing listeners who were tested under 308 conditions of filtering and masking. The importance function for the W-22 test has a broader frequency range and a different shape than the importance function used in the current ANSI standard on the Articulation Index (ANSI, 1969). The transfer function is similar in slope to to the ANSI transfer function for 256 PB-words, but is shifted to the right of that function by 0.05 Al.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank Carol G. Hustedde and Joseph S. Matesich for their assistance with data collection and instrumentation. We would also like to thank David Fabry, Chaslav Pavlovic, Dianne Van Tasell, and an anonymous reviewer for their valuable comments on the original manuscript. This project was supported by grant DC00154 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Portions of this work were presented at the November convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in 1988.
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