An Application of the Articulation Index to Hearing Aid Fitting The application of the articulation index (Al) model to the fitting of linear amplification was evaluated for 12 subjects with sensorineural hearing loss. Comparisons were made of amplification characteristics specified by the NAL (Byrne & Dillon, 1986) and POGO (McCandless & Lyregaard, 1983) prescriptions, as well as a procedure that ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
An Application of the Articulation Index to Hearing Aid Fitting
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine M. Rankovic
    Department of Communication Disorders University of Minnesota
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Christine M. Rankovic at the Research Laboratory of Electronics, Building 36-749, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139.
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
An Application of the Articulation Index to Hearing Aid Fitting
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 391-402. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.391
History: Received January 23, 1990 , Accepted June 5, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 391-402. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.391
History: Received January 23, 1990; Accepted June 5, 1990

The application of the articulation index (Al) model to the fitting of linear amplification was evaluated for 12 subjects with sensorineural hearing loss. Comparisons were made of amplification characteristics specified by the NAL (Byrne & Dillon, 1986) and POGO (McCandless & Lyregaard, 1983) prescriptions, as well as a procedure that attempted to maximize the Al (AlMax). For all subjects, the relationship between percent-correct scores on a nonsense syllable test and Als was monotonic for the two prescriptions, indicating that the Al was effective for comparing conditions typical of those recommended clinically. However, subjects having sloping high-frequency hearing losses demonstrated nonmonotonicity due to poor performance in the AlMax condition. For these subjects, the AlMax condition required much more gain at high than at low frequencies, circumstances that Skinner (1980) warned will cause less-than-optimal performance for individuals having sloping high-frequency hearing loss.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NICHHD T32 HD-07151, NINCDS NS12125, T32 NS07099-11, and the Bryng Bryngelson Communication Disorders Research Fund at the University of Minnesota. The comments of P. M. Zurek, L. D. Braida, and K. W. Grant on several versions of the manuscript are deeply appreciated. J. L. Clay and D. J. Van Tasell (dissertation advisor) also contributed to this work. Portions of this research were presented at the 116th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Honolulu, Hawaii, November 15, 1988.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access