Validity and Reliability of Tympanometric Measures for Pediatric Patients Sensitivity and specificity of static acoustic admittance (SAA) and tympanometric width (TW) were assessed for 116 pediatric patients. Otologic examination was the validation criterion. Reliability of immediate repeat tympanometric measures (SAA, TW, peak pressure, and estimate of ear canal volume) was also evaluated. A statistically significant change in SAA, with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
Validity and Reliability of Tympanometric Measures for Pediatric Patients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roanne G. Karzon
    Washington University School of Medicine
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Roanne G. Karzon, Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, 4911 Barnes Hospital Plaza, St. Louis, MO 63110.
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
Validity and Reliability of Tympanometric Measures for Pediatric Patients
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 386-390. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.386
History: Received July 10, 1989 , Accepted June 6, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 386-390. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.386
History: Received July 10, 1989; Accepted June 6, 1990

Sensitivity and specificity of static acoustic admittance (SAA) and tympanometric width (TW) were assessed for 116 pediatric patients. Otologic examination was the validation criterion. Reliability of immediate repeat tympanometric measures (SAA, TW, peak pressure, and estimate of ear canal volume) was also evaluated. A statistically significant change in SAA, with a larger SAA on measure two than measure one, was observed. No significant change across the two sequential measures was observed for TW, peak pressure, or the estimate of ear canal volume. The sensitivity and specificity data collected are discussed with respect to assisting clinicians in selecting tympanometric criteria suitable to their own clinical situation.

Acknowledgments
The Department of Otolaryngology of Washington University School of Medicine is acknowledged for support provided during data collection, analysis, and manuscript preparation. A special thanks to the audiologists, Beverly Turner, Sue Stroble, and Kay Park for collecting data and offering suggestions for interpretation. The manuscript reviews of Gerald Popelka, Margaret Skinner, Harlan Muntz, Robert Margolis, and the audiologists were extremely helpful in shaping the final manuscript.
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