High-Level Psychophysical Tuning Curves Simultaneous Masking With Different Noise Bandwidths Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
High-Level Psychophysical Tuning Curves
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David A. Nelson
    Hearing Research Laboratory Departments of Otolaryngology and Communication Disorders University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Todd W. Fortune
    Hearing Research Laboratory Departments of Otolaryngology and Communication Disorders University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to David A. Nelson, Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Department of Otolaryngology Medical School, 2630 University Avenue, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55414.
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
High-Level Psychophysical Tuning Curves
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 374-378. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.374
History: Received October 20, 1989 , Accepted August 16, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 374-378. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.374
History: Received October 20, 1989; Accepted August 16, 1990

Simultaneous-masked psychophysical tuning curves were measured with narrow-band noise maskers varying in bandwidth from 40 Hz to 800 Hz to determine the masker bandwidths at which combination-band detection cues no longer influence tuning-curve shapes. Tuning curves were obtained at 1000 and 4000 Hz from normal-hearing listeners using high-level (60 dB SPL) probe tones in quiet and in the presence of a broadband background noise to eliminate combination bands and other off-frequency listening cues that exist at high levels. High-level tuning curves revealed notches on the low-frequency sides. Those notches were eliminated with broad-band background noise, which indicates that combination bands can strongly influence the shapes of high-level tuning curves obtained with narrow-band maskers, primarily by steepening the low-frequency and tail slopes. Combination-band detection cues had a stronger influence at 4000 Hz than at 1000 Hz. As masker bandwidth increased, combination bands had less influence on tuning-curve shapes. These results suggest a possible relation between masker bandwidth and auditory critical bandwidth: combination bands affected the lowfrequency sides of the tuning curves only when the masker bandwidth was less than the auditory critical bandwidth.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by NIDCD grants DC00110 and DC00149. The authors wish to thank D. D. Greenwood and two anonymous reviewers for their extensive suggestions on an earlier version of this manuscript.
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