Poststroke Depression Neurologic, Physiologic, Diagnostic, and Treatment Implications Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
Poststroke Depression
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol S. Swindell
    Memphis State University
  • Jo-Ann Hammons
    Memphis State University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Carol S. Swindell, Audiology and Speech Pathology, Memphis State University, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105.
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
Poststroke Depression
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 325-333. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.325
History: Received October 13, 1988 , Accepted June 6, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 325-333. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.325
History: Received October 13, 1988; Accepted June 6, 1990

Poststroke depression is a serious disorder that can compromise the overall rehabilitative process, including speech-language treatment. To provide patients with the maximum opportunity for recovery and therapeutic gains, speech-language pathologists need to increase their awareness of depression and understand the neurologic, physiologic, diagnostic, and treatment implications of this disorder. This article defines depression and reviews the theories that explain the nature of the disorder as well as methods for diagnosing and treating stroke patients who are clinically depressed.

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