Analysis of Children’s Word-Finding Skills in Discourse This investigation analyzed children’s word-finding skills in discourse. The subjects, 16 children with word-finding problems and 16 normal children in Grades 1–6, were matched for sex, age, grade, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, geographic region, and receptive language. Subjects’ narratives, produced in response to three pictures and five probes, were tape recorded, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
Analysis of Children’s Word-Finding Skills in Discourse
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane J. German
    National-Louis University Evanston, IL
  • Elaine Simon
    Delaware County Intermediate Unit Media, PA
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Diane J. German, Special Education, National-Louis University, 2840 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60201.
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
Analysis of Children’s Word-Finding Skills in Discourse
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 309-316. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.309
History: Received October 30, 1989 , Accepted April 6, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 309-316. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.309
History: Received October 30, 1989; Accepted April 6, 1990

This investigation analyzed children’s word-finding skills in discourse. The subjects, 16 children with word-finding problems and 16 normal children in Grades 1–6, were matched for sex, age, grade, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, geographic region, and receptive language. Subjects’ narratives, produced in response to three pictures and five probes, were tape recorded, transcribed, and analyzed with respect to the following word-finding indices: language productivity and the incidence of word-finding characteristics (repetitions, reformulations, substitutions, delays, empty words, time fillers, and insertions). Group comparisons were made with respect to these indices. Children with word-finding disorders did not differ from normal children in language productivity but manifested significantly more word-finding characteristics in their narratives. These findings are discussed with respect to characteristics and assessment of and intervention for children with word-finding disorders in discourse.

Acknowledgment
This work was partially supported by a March of Dimes Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Grant.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access