Reliability and Agreement of Ratings of Ataxic Dysarthric Speech Samples With Varying Intelligibility Indices of interjudge reliability and inter- and intrajudge agreement were calculated from the ratings made by 15 experienced speech clinicians on five deviant speech dimensions with respect to 15 speakers with ataxic dysarthria. Speakers were chosen to cover a wide range of speech intelligibility (16–97%) as measured by the sentence ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
Reliability and Agreement of Ratings of Ataxic Dysarthric Speech Samples With Varying Intelligibility
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine Sheard
    Cumberland College of Health Sciences The University of Sydney Australia
  • Roger D. Adams
    Cumberland College of Health Sciences The University of Sydney Australia
  • Pamela J. Davis
    Cumberland College of Health Sciences The University of Sydney Australia
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Christine Sheard, School of Communication Disorders, Cumberland College of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 170, Lidcombe, 2141, Australia.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
Reliability and Agreement of Ratings of Ataxic Dysarthric Speech Samples With Varying Intelligibility
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 285-293. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.285
History: Received October 27, 1989 , Accepted April 27, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 285-293. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.285
History: Received October 27, 1989; Accepted April 27, 1990

Indices of interjudge reliability and inter- and intrajudge agreement were calculated from the ratings made by 15 experienced speech clinicians on five deviant speech dimensions with respect to 15 speakers with ataxic dysarthria. Speakers were chosen to cover a wide range of speech intelligibility (16–97%) as measured by the sentence intelligibility transcriptions of the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech (Yorkston & Beukelman, 1981). Intraclass correlation coefficients derived from each judge on two occasions were above .6 for imprecise consonants, excess and equal stress, and harsh voice, but below .6 for distorted vowels and below .5 for irregular articulatory breakdown. The last dimension also had the lowest percent agreement for the interjudge and intrajudge comparisons. Poor speech dimension definition seems to be the most likely source of error on irregular articulatory breakdown. Judges agreed equally well in rating dysarthric speech across the range from low to high intelligibility.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to acknowledge the assistance provided by Dr. Vicki Reed and Ms. Margaret McMullen, whose comments aided the preparation of this manuscript. Thanks are also extended to the clinicians who judged the speech samples and to the speakers who provided them.
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