Following Up on Treated Stutterers Studies of Perceptions of Fluency and Job Status Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
Following Up on Treated Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. R. Craig
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia
  • P. Calver
    Gold Coast Rehabilitation Unit Queensland, Australia
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to A. Craig, Psychology, P.O. Box 123, Broadway NSW, Australia 2007.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
Following Up on Treated Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 279-284. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.279
History: Received July 20, 1989 , Accepted July 2, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 279-284. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.279
History: Received July 20, 1989; Accepted July 2, 1990

The present research aimed to investigate perceptions of fluency of persons treated with a fluency shaping technique called smooth speech. Four separate studies were conducted. The first showed that virtually all those treated were satisfied with their fluency following treatment. However, this satisfaction decreased to under half in the long term. The second study showed considerable opportunity in the long term for job promotion and upgrade in occupation for persons successfully completing a smooth-speech program. The third study compared employer perceptions of their employees’ speech between a group who had received treatment for stuttering and a nontreatment control. The employers’ perceptions of the treatment group were significantly enhanced, whereas no significant change occurred in employers’ perceptions for the control group. The last study explored possible determinants of relapse in a population of treated stutterers. Results showed that most had experienced some degree of relapse, but had subsequently recovered. Few believed their relapse was associated with being embarrassed about using smooth speech. The majority believed their relapses were related to feeling pressured to speak faster. Investigating perceptions of fluency following treatment for stuttering seems an important goal for research in order to enhance treatment effectiveness. Directions for further research into this area are discussed.

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