Laryngeal Reaction Time Profiles in Spasmodic Dysphonia Relationship to Cortical Electrophysiologic Abnormality Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
Laryngeal Reaction Time Profiles in Spasmodic Dysphonia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ben C. Watson
    The Dallas Center for Vocal Motor Control The University of Texas at Dallas and at Arlington, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and The Neuroscience Research Center
  • Frances J. Freeman
    The Dallas Center for Vocal Motor Control The University of Texas at Dallas and at Arlington, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and The Neuroscience Research Center
  • Kenneth D. Pool
    The Dallas Center for Vocal Motor Control The University of Texas at Dallas and at Arlington, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and The Neuroscience Research Center
  • Terese Finitzo
    The Dallas Center for Vocal Motor Control The University of Texas at Dallas and at Arlington, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and The Neuroscience Research Center
  • Sandi B. Chapman
    The Dallas Center for Vocal Motor Control The University of Texas at Dallas and at Arlington, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and The Neuroscience Research Center
  • Dianne Mendelsohn
    The Dallas Center for Vocal Motor Control The University of Texas at Dallas and at Arlington, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and The Neuroscience Research Center
  • Michael D. Devous, Sr.
    The Dallas Center for Vocal Motor Control The University of Texas at Dallas and at Arlington, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and The Neuroscience Research Center
  • Steven D. Schaefer
    The Dallas Center for Vocal Motor Control The University of Texas at Dallas and at Arlington, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and The Neuroscience Research Center
  • Lanny G. Close
    The Dallas Center for Vocal Motor Control The University of Texas at Dallas and at Arlington, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and The Neuroscience Research Center
  • George V. Kondraske
    The Dallas Center for Vocal Motor Control The University of Texas at Dallas and at Arlington, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and The Neuroscience Research Center
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Ben C. Watson, Callier Center, 1966 Inwood Rd., Dallas, TX 75235.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
Laryngeal Reaction Time Profiles in Spasmodic Dysphonia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 269-278. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.269
History: Received October 18, 1989 , Accepted April 27, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 269-278. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.269
History: Received October 18, 1989; Accepted April 27, 1990

This study combines measures of linguistic and vocal performance and long-latency auditory electrophysiology to investigate task-dependent variability in spasmodic dysphonia (SD). Linguistic performance was evaluated using several measures of relatively complex linguistic ability (i.e., discourse analysis). Vocal performance was evaluated by measuring acoustic laryngeal reaction time (LRT) for tasks that differ in complexity. Normal structure of the cortex and subcortex was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Cortical function was measured using multichannel quantitative auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). As a group, SD subjects who demonstrated subtle linguistic deficits also demonstrated prolonged LRT for the complex task and repeated and persistent auditory electrophysiologic abnormalities over the anterior quadrant of the left hemisphere. As a group, linguistically normal SD subjects demonstrated no significant increase in LRT for the complex task and no recurrent electrophysiologic abnormalities over the left anterior cortex relative to normal controls. Results support a neurogenic origin of SD and suggest that some aspects of inter- and intrasubject variability may be related to differences in loci and magnitude of cortical abnormalities.

Acknowledgments
Research supported by NIH grants NS18276 and DC00410. James Dembowski and Adrienn Donnel assisted with data collection. J. Soman-Williams assisted with LRT validity analyses. J. Chyu and B. Croy provided technical assistance. We are especially indebted to the SD and normal subjects who participated in this research.
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