Key Word Signing Perceived and Acoustic Differences Between Signed and Spoken Narratives Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
Key Word Signing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Windsor
    Purdue University
  • Macalyne Fristoe
    Purdue University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Jennifer Windsor, Department of Communications Disorders, 115 Shevlin Hall, University of Minnesota, 164 Pillsbury Drive S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
Key Word Signing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 260-268. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.260
History: Received February 8, 1990 , Accepted August 20, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 260-268. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.260
History: Received February 8, 1990; Accepted August 20, 1990

Key-word-sign (KWS) and speech-only programs differ in the results they achieve with nonspeaking individuals. This difference might be traced to suprasegmental aspects of speech. In an earlier study. Windsor and Fristoe (1989) showed that untrained listeners could distinguish speech produced using KWS from speech only. In the present study, acoustic measures as well as listener judgments of KWS and spoken-only (S-O) narratives were obtained. Compared to S-O narratives, KWS narratives were produced with a slower articulation rate, due to increased pause and speech segment duration and increased pause number. Within-sentence pauses in KWS narratives tended to occur immediately after a signed word.

Acknowledgments
The help of Sue Young Kim in interjudge reliability checking is gratefully acknowledged, as is the assistance of staff members at the Child Development Center, Chicago, for their participation as speaker-signers in the study. Our appreciation is also extended to Laurence B. Leonard for his helpful comments.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access