Lip Muscle EMG Responses to Oral Pressure Stimulation Sinusoidal intraoral pressure changes having peak-to-peak amplitudes of 2–6 cmH20 were applied at frequencies of 2–14 Hz. Reflex responses were observed in the lip muscle EMG of all 6 subjects tested. Across subjects, the phase shift of EMG responses varied in a linear manner with stimulus frequency. This suggests that ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1991
Lip Muscle EMG Responses to Oral Pressure Stimulation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael D. McClean
    University of Toronto
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Michael D. McClean, Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307-5001.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1991
Lip Muscle EMG Responses to Oral Pressure Stimulation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 248-251. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.248
History: Received February 8, 1990 , Accepted July 27, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 248-251. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.248
History: Received February 8, 1990; Accepted July 27, 1990

Sinusoidal intraoral pressure changes having peak-to-peak amplitudes of 2–6 cmH20 were applied at frequencies of 2–14 Hz. Reflex responses were observed in the lip muscle EMG of all 6 subjects tested. Across subjects, the phase shift of EMG responses varied in a linear manner with stimulus frequency. This suggests that responses were mediated over a reflex pathway having a relatively fixed response latency. Step-like changes in oral pressure produced a consistent excitatory response having a latency of 30–35 ms. The fact that reflexes may be elicited in lip muscles with oral pressure changes similar to those occurring in speech increases the likelihood that mechanoreceptor responses to intraoral pressure changes are involved in sensorimotor integration for speech production.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a grant from the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, Toronto. I wish to thank Dr. Hans Kunov of the University of Toronto for providing the speaker system used for pressure stimulation.
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