Lexicalization in Adults Who Stutter Response to Au-Yeung and Howell (1999) Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   June 01, 2000
Lexicalization in Adults Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Prins
    Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences University of Washington Seattle
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   June 01, 2000
Lexicalization in Adults Who Stutter
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 811-813. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.811
History: Received February 14, 2000 , Accepted March 1, 2000
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 811-813. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.811
History: Received February 14, 2000; Accepted March 1, 2000
In 1997 we reported in JSLHR the results of two experiments concerning lexicalization in adults who stutter (Prins, Main, & Wampler, 1997). Lexicalization comprises two principal processes: L1, selection and grammatical encoding of a word on the basis of its semantic and syntactic properties; and L2, retrieval and encoding of a word’s form information, including its phonological and phonetic constituents. The high-speed performance of normally fluent speech (2–3 words, 10–15 phones/s) requires these processes to overlap in a special way. As described by Levelt (1994), there is a “roofing tile style of parallel processing.…It is simultaneous-ness in seriality” (p. 2254).
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