The Dysphonia Severity Index An Objective Measure of Vocal Quality Based on a Multiparameter Approach Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2000
The Dysphonia Severity Index
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Floris L. Wuyts
    University of Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium
  • Marc S. De Bodt
    University of Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium
  • Geert Molenberghs
    Limburgs Universitair Centrum Diepenbeek, Belgium
  • Marc Remacle
    University of Louvain Yvoir, Belgium
  • Louis Heylen
    University of Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium
  • Benoite Millet
    Brussels, Belgium
  • Kristiane Van Lierde
    University of Gent Gent, Belgium
  • Jan Raes
    University of Brussels Jette, Belgium
  • Paul H. Van de Heyning
    University of Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium
  • Contact author: Floris L. Wuyts, PhD, University Hospital of Antwerp, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem, Belgium.
    Contact author: Floris L. Wuyts, PhD, University Hospital of Antwerp, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Wilrijkstraat 10, B-2650 Edegem, Belgium.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: wuyts@uia.ua.ac.be
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2000
The Dysphonia Severity Index
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 796-809. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.796
History: Received May 13, 1999 , Accepted November 22, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 796-809. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.796
History: Received May 13, 1999; Accepted November 22, 1999

The vocal quality of a patient is modeled by means of a Dysphonia Severity Index (DSI), which is designed to establish an objective and quantitative correlate of the perceived vocal quality. The DSI is based on the weighted combination of the following selected set of voice measurements: highest frequency (F0-High in Hz), lowest intensity (I-Low in dB), maximum phonation time (MPT in s), and jitter (%). The DSI is derived from a multivariate analysis of 387 subjects with the goal of describing, purely based on objective measures, the perceived voice quality. It is constructed as DSI=0.13 x MPT + 0.0053 x F0-High – 0.26 x I-Low – 1.18 x Jitter (%) + 12.4. The DSI for perceptually normal voices equals +5 and for severely dysphonic voices –5. The more negative the patient's index, the worse is his or her vocal quality. As such, the DSI is especially useful to evaluate therapeutic evolution of dysphonic patients. Additionally, there is a high correlation between the DSI and the Voice Handicap Index score.

Acknowledgments
We wish to thank Soetkin Debelder for the syntax check as well as all subjects contributing to this study by lending their voice. Part of this work was presented at the IALP meeting in August 1998 in Amsterdam.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access