The Effect of Information on Listeners' Attitudes Toward Speakers With Voice or Resonance Disorders This study investigated university students' attitudes toward women with voice or resonance disorders and whether providing listeners with information about those disorders affected their attitudes towards the women. Eighty students listened to speech samples of 9 women: 3 with normal voice/resonance, 3 with moderate hoarseness/breathiness, and 3 with moderate hypernasality ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2000
The Effect of Information on Listeners' Attitudes Toward Speakers With Voice or Resonance Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amarpreet K. Lallh
    Capital Health Edmonton, Canada
  • Anne Putnam Rochet
    Capital Health Edmonton, Canada
  • Contact author: Amarpreet K. Lallh, MSc, Capital Health Authority, 10019 84 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T6A 3P8.
    Contact author: Amarpreet K. Lallh, MSc, Capital Health Authority, 10019 84 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T6A 3P8.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: alallh@cha.ab.ca
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2000
The Effect of Information on Listeners' Attitudes Toward Speakers With Voice or Resonance Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 782-795. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.782
History: Received June 14, 1999 , Accepted November 22, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 782-795. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.782
History: Received June 14, 1999; Accepted November 22, 1999

This study investigated university students' attitudes toward women with voice or resonance disorders and whether providing listeners with information about those disorders affected their attitudes towards the women. Eighty students listened to speech samples of 9 women: 3 with normal voice/resonance, 3 with moderate hoarseness/breathiness, and 3 with moderate hypernasality and nasal emission. Before listening to the speech samples, 40 students read two pages of information about the disorders, and 40 read two pages of neutral information. Attitudes were measured with 24 semantic differential scales. Results indicated that listeners perceived speakers with voice/resonance disorders more negatively than speakers without disorders. The attitudes of listeners who read voice and resonance information did not differ from those of listeners who read neutral information.

Acknowledgments
This study was conducted by the first author as partial fulfillment of the requirements for a master of science degree at the University of Alberta. The authors thank Dr. Paul Hagler and Dr. James Vargo for their assistance with this research as members of the thesis committee.
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