Personality and Voice Disorders A Superfactor Trait Analysis Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2000
Personality and Voice Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nelson Roy
    Department of Communication Disorders and Division of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery The University of Utah Salt Lake City
  • Diane M. Bless
    Department of Communication Disorders and Division of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery The University of Utah Salt Lake City
  • Dennis Heisey
    Department of Communication Disorders and Division of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery The University of Utah Salt Lake City
  • Contact author: Nelson Roy, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Utah, 390 South 1530 East, Room 1219, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252.
    Contact author: Nelson Roy, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Utah, 390 South 1530 East, Room 1219, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: nelson.roy@health.utah.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2000
Personality and Voice Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 749-768. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.749
History: Received April 14, 1999 , Accepted October 26, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 749-768. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.749
History: Received April 14, 1999; Accepted October 26, 1999

To determine whether personality factors play causal, concomitant, or consequential roles in common voice disorders, a vocally normal control group and four groups with voice disorders—functional dysphonia (FD), vocal nodules (VN), spasmodic dysphonia (SD), and unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP)—were compared on measures of personality and psychological adjustment. Superfactor group comparisons revealed that the majority of FD and VN subjects were classified as introverts and extraverts, respectively. Comparisons involving the SD, UVFP, and control subjects did not identify consistent personality differences. The disability hypothesis, which suggests that personality features and emotional maladjustment are solely a negative consequence of vocal disability, was not supported. Personality variables and their behavioral consequences may therefore contribute to FD and VN. Results are presented within the context of a dispositional theory offered by Roy and Bless (2000a).

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by the National Center for Voice and Speech through Grant P60 00976 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Parts of this manuscript were presented at the 1997 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA.
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