Personality Traits and Psychological Factors in Voice Pathology A Foundation for Future Research Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2000
Personality Traits and Psychological Factors in Voice Pathology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nelson Roy
    Department of Communication Disorders and Division of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery The University of Utah Salt Lake City
  • Diane M. Bless
    Department of Communicative Disorders and Division of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Nelson Roy, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Utah, 390 South 1530 East, Room 1219, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252.
    Contact author: Nelson Roy, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, University of Utah, 390 South 1530 East, Room 1219, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: nelson.roy@health.utah.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2000
Personality Traits and Psychological Factors in Voice Pathology
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 737-748. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.737
History: Received April 14, 1999 , Accepted October 26, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 737-748. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.737
History: Received April 14, 1999; Accepted October 26, 1999

It has been argued that personality, emotions, and psychological problems contribute to or are primary causes of voice disorders and that voice disorders in turn create psychological problems and personality effects. This article (a) briefly reviews the literature surrounding the role of psychological and personality processes in individuals with functional dysphonia (FD), vocal nodules (VN), and spasmodic dysphonia (SD); (b) provides an overview of recent concepts in personality and trait structure; and (c) summarizes the fundamental tenets of a theoretical synthesis proposed by Roy and Bless (2000)  to explain the dispositional bases of FD and VN. This theory links FD and VN to the signal sensitivities and behavioral response biases of neurotic introverts and neurotic extraverts, respectively. In a companion article, the merits of the Roy and Bless theory are evaluated.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by the National Center for Voice and Speech through Grant P60 00976 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Parts of this manuscript were presented at the 1997 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Boston, MA. The authors gratefully acknowledge Lisa Roteliuk, for her assistance in manuscript preparation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access