Perception of Dysphonic Voice Quality by Naive Listeners For clinical assessment as well as student training, there is a need for information pertaining to the perceptual dimensions of dysphonic voice. To this end, 24 naive listeners judged the similarity of 10 female and 10 male vowel samples, selected from within a narrow range of fundamental frequencies. Most of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2000
Perception of Dysphonic Voice Quality by Naive Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Virginia I. Wolfe
    Auburn University at Montgomery Montgomery, AL
  • David P. Martin
    Auburn University at Montgomery Montgomery, AL
  • Chester I. Palmer
    Auburn University at Montgomery Montgomery, AL
  • Contact author: Virginia Wolfe, PhD, Auburn University at Montgomery, Department of Communication and Dramatic Arts, 7300 University Drive, Montgomery, AL 36117-3596.
    Contact author: Virginia Wolfe, PhD, Auburn University at Montgomery, Department of Communication and Dramatic Arts, 7300 University Drive, Montgomery, AL 36117-3596.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: vwolfe@edla.aum.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2000
Perception of Dysphonic Voice Quality by Naive Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 697-705. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.697
History: Received March 9, 1999 , Accepted October 8, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 697-705. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.697
History: Received March 9, 1999; Accepted October 8, 1999

For clinical assessment as well as student training, there is a need for information pertaining to the perceptual dimensions of dysphonic voice. To this end, 24 naive listeners judged the similarity of 10 female and 10 male vowel samples, selected from within a narrow range of fundamental frequencies. Most of the perceptual variance for both sets of voices was associated with "degree of abnormality" as reflected by perceptual ratings as well as combined acoustic measures, based upon filtered and unfiltered signals. A second perceptual dimension for female voices was associated with high frequency noise as reflected by two acoustic measures: breathiness index (BRI) and a high-frequency power ratio. A second perceptual dimension for male voices was associated with a breathy-overtight continuum as reflected by period deviation (PDdev) and perceptual ratings of breathiness. Results are discussed in terms of perceptual training and the clinical assessment of pathological voices.

Acknowledgments
Partial support for this project was received from the AUM Grant-in-Aid Program.
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