Effects of Otitis Media With Effusion on Hearing in the First 3 Years of Life Hearing sensitivity was examined prospectively in young children as a function of otitis media with effusion (OME) status in Years 1, 2, and 3. Hearing and OME status were sampled bimonthly from 5 to 36 months of age. Behavioral thresholds were obtained at 4 test frequencies (500, 1000, 2000, and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2000
Effects of Otitis Media With Effusion on Hearing in the First 3 Years of Life
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith S. Gravel
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY
  • Ina F. Wallace
    Research Triangle Institute Research Triangle Park, NC Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY
  • Contact author: Judith S. Gravel, PhD, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Room 843, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave., Bronx, NY 10461.
    Contact author: Judith S. Gravel, PhD, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Room 843, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave., Bronx, NY 10461.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: gravel@aecom.yu.edu
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2000
Effects of Otitis Media With Effusion on Hearing in the First 3 Years of Life
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 631-644. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.631
History: Received February 24, 1999 , Accepted October 21, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 631-644. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.631
History: Received February 24, 1999; Accepted October 21, 1999

Hearing sensitivity was examined prospectively in young children as a function of otitis media with effusion (OME) status in Years 1, 2, and 3. Hearing and OME status were sampled bimonthly from 5 to 36 months of age. Behavioral thresholds were obtained at 4 test frequencies (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) using visual reinforcement audiometry and conditioned play audiometry techniques. The majority of children's audiograms were obtained using a computer-controlled test procedure. Thresholds for the test frequencies were averaged for each visit and then averaged across all visits in each year. Reference values were developed for infants and children in Years 1, 2, and 3 who were OME free. Results reveal that children who were classified as bilaterally OME positive in Years 1, 2, and 3 had significantly poorer hearing than children classified as bilaterally OME free in each of these time periods. There was no difference in hearing as a function of gender, socioeconomic status, or birth-risk status.

Acknowledgments
Martha Anne Ellis and Wei Wei Lee were the research audiologists for the ChEARs Project. Their significant contributions to the successful completion of this study are immeasurable, and they are gratefully acknowledged. Thanks to Loretta Garin who recruited and maintained this cohort of children. The children and their families are also thanked for their active participation throughout the course of this study. Lisa Hunter, Robert Nozza, and an anonymous reviewer provided valuable reviews of the original version of this manuscript. We are indebted to them for their constructive and thoughtful critiques. We also recognize Robert Margolis for his helpful insight. This research was supported by Research Grant 5 P50 DC 00223 from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health.
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