Digit Span in Individuals With Down Syndrome and in Typically Developing Children Temporal Aspects Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2000
Digit Span in Individuals With Down Syndrome and in Typically Developing Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hye-Kyeung Seung
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Robin Chapman
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Hye-Kyeung Seung, PhD, The University of Texas at El Paso, College of Health Sciences, Speech-Language Pathology, El Paso, TX 79902-0639.
    Contact author: Hye-Kyeung Seung, PhD, The University of Texas at El Paso, College of Health Sciences, Speech-Language Pathology, El Paso, TX 79902-0639.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: hkseung@hotmail.com
  • Currently affiliated with University of Texas at El Paso
    Currently affiliated with University of Texas at El Paso×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2000
Digit Span in Individuals With Down Syndrome and in Typically Developing Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 609-620. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.609
History: Received December 4, 1998 , Accepted December 3, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 609-620. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.609
History: Received December 4, 1998; Accepted December 3, 1999

This study explored factors influencing digit span performance in individuals with Down syndrome. The following questions were asked: Is there a deficit in the phonological loop, either in articulatory rehearsal (measured in speaking rate and recall latency) or in the passive store (measured in recall duration)? Is reduced auditory short-term memory associated with a language production deficit? Thirty five adolescents with trisomy 21 Down syndrome were compared to 35 mental-age-matched and 35 language-production-matched controls. There was no group difference in speaking rate. The DS group had shorter digit spans than the MA controls. Language production level accounted for substantial variance in digit span in individuals with Down syndrome.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by NIH grant R01 HD23353 to Robin Chapman. This study was a part of the dissertation of the first author. Part of this study was presented at the 1997 American Speech and Hearing Association convention in Boston, MA. We thank the participants for their help as well as Suzanne Miller, Dorothy Ross, Robin Samlan, Heidi Sindberg, and Nadia Teitler who tested participants.
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