Phonological Awareness and Oral Reading Skill in Children With Down Syndrome The existence of a necessary association between phonological awareness (PA) and oral reading development has been questioned using evidence from children with Down syndrome. In this study, 22 children with Down syndrome (between the ages of 6;7 and 10;3) initially completed tests of receptive language, cognitive function, oral reading, and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2000
Phonological Awareness and Oral Reading Skill in Children With Down Syndrome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Cupples
    Macquarie University Sydney, Australia
  • Teresa Iacono
    Macquarie University Sydney, Australia
  • Contact author: Linda Cupples, PhD, Department of Linguistics, Building C5A, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia.
    Contact author: Linda Cupples, PhD, Department of Linguistics, Building C5A, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia.×
  • Corresponding author: Email: linda.cupples@mq.edu.au
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2000
Phonological Awareness and Oral Reading Skill in Children With Down Syndrome
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 595-608. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.595
History: Received November 30, 1998 , Accepted November 23, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2000, Vol. 43, 595-608. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4303.595
History: Received November 30, 1998; Accepted November 23, 1999

The existence of a necessary association between phonological awareness (PA) and oral reading development has been questioned using evidence from children with Down syndrome. In this study, 22 children with Down syndrome (between the ages of 6;7 and 10;3) initially completed tests of receptive language, cognitive function, oral reading, and PA. Reading and PA were reassessed approximately 9 months later. Better oral reading was associated with superior phoneme segmentation skills on reassessment. Furthermore, there was some evidence that early segmentation ability predicted later nonword reading, but not the reverse. The results indicate an association between PA and early oral reading ability in children with Down syndrome and are interpreted within a theoretical view of reading development in which PA plays a central role.

Acknowledgments
The research reported in this paper was funded by grants from the Australian Research Council, Macquarie University, and the School of English, Linguistics, and Media at Macquarie University. We thank Paula Jones for her assistance in preparing test materials and administering assessments.
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