Kinematic Correlates of Speaking Rate Changes in Stuttering and Normally Fluent Adults Articulatory kinematics were analyzed to determine if adults who stutter are generally poorer at speech movement pattern generation and if changing speech rate affects their stability in the same way that it affects normally fluent controls. Adults who stutter (n= 14) and a matched group of controls produced fluent repetitions ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2000
Kinematic Correlates of Speaking Rate Changes in Stuttering and Normally Fluent Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne Smith
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Jennifer Kleinow
    Purdue University West Lafayette, IN
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: asmith@purdue.edu
  • Contact author: Anne Smith, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47907. E-mail, asmith@purdue.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2000
Kinematic Correlates of Speaking Rate Changes in Stuttering and Normally Fluent Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2000, Vol. 43, 521-536. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4302.521
History: Received January 25, 1999 , Accepted August 9, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2000, Vol. 43, 521-536. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4302.521
History: Received January 25, 1999; Accepted August 9, 1999

Articulatory kinematics were analyzed to determine if adults who stutter are generally poorer at speech movement pattern generation and if changing speech rate affects their stability in the same way that it affects normally fluent controls. Adults who stutter (n= 14) and a matched group of controls produced fluent repetitions of a simple phrase at normal, slow, and fast rates. A composite index of spatiotemporal stability (STI), as well as independent measures of timing and spatial variability, revealed that adults who stutter can operate within normal movement parameter ranges under low-demand speaking conditions. However, some of the stuttering participants showed evidence of abnormal instability even when repeating a simple utterance at habitual rate. Also, measures of relative timing indicated that adults who stutter, unlike their matched controls, are not better timers at habitual vs. nonpreferred speech rates. Overall, the results suggest that the kinematic characteristics of the fluent speech of adults who stutter generally overlap that of normally fluent speakers; however, subtle differences in kinematic parameters are interpreted to reveal their susceptibility to speech motor breakdown when performance demands increase.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by NIH Grant DC00559.
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