Predicting Language Production in Children and Adolescents With Down Syndrome The Role of Comprehension Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2000
Predicting Language Production in Children and Adolescents With Down Syndrome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robin S. Chapman
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Hye-Kyeung Seung
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Scott E. Schwartz
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Elizabeth Kay-Raining Bird
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: chapman@waisman.wisc.edu
  • Contact author: Robin S. Chapman, PhD, Waisman Center,1500 Highland Ave., Madison, WI 53705. Email: chapman@waisman.wisc.edu
  • Currently affiliated with the University of Texas-El Paso
    Currently affiliated with the University of Texas-El Paso×
  • Currently affiliated with the Boulder Valley, CO, School District
    Currently affiliated with the Boulder Valley, CO, School District×
  • Currently affiliated with Dalhousie University
    Currently affiliated with Dalhousie University×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2000
Predicting Language Production in Children and Adolescents With Down Syndrome
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2000, Vol. 43, 340-350. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4302.340
History: Received July 14, 1999 , Accepted September 13, 1999
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2000, Vol. 43, 340-350. doi:10.1044/jslhr.4302.340
History: Received July 14, 1999; Accepted September 13, 1999

Predictors of language production skills in 12-minute narratives are investigated cross-sectionally in 48 children and adolescents with Down syndrome (trisomy 21), aged 5 to 20 years, in comparison to 48 control children aged 2 to 6 years matched statistically for nonverbal mental age and mother’s years of education. Two models were evaluated by hierarchical regression analyses using predictors drawn from the domains of group membership, chronological age, cognition, socioeconomic status, and hearing screening status (Model I) and, additionally, comprehension performance (Model II). Results showed that Model II was more successful. In the DS group, it explained 68% of the variability in number of different words, 80% in MLU, and 32% in intelligibility. Corresponding percentages for the control group were 72%, 71%, and 26%. A mechanism linking comprehension of input to early stages of production practice through activation of the early speech motor area is proposed.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by NIH Grant R01 HD23353 to the senior author. The help of the children and parents who participated is gratefully acknowledged, as is the assistance of Denise Maybach in supervising the transcription lab.
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