Response to Craig We appreciate Craig’s comments regarding our report and the opportunity to respond. Dialogues such as these can only lead to advances in approaches to studying and understanding the enigma of stuttering. Craig enumerated three threats to the validity of our results. We address each in the order in which it ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   February 01, 1994
Response to Craig
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ben C. Watson
    New York Medical College Valhalla, NY
  • Susan Miller
    Georgetown University Medical Center Washington, DC
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   February 01, 1994
Response to Craig
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 92-95. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.92
History: Received September 10, 1993 , Accepted September 27, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 92-95. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.92
History: Received September 10, 1993; Accepted September 27, 1993
We appreciate Craig’s comments regarding our report and the opportunity to respond. Dialogues such as these can only lead to advances in approaches to studying and understanding the enigma of stuttering. Craig enumerated three threats to the validity of our results. We address each in the order in which it was presented.
“The majority of their subjects had been treated prior to their assessment.” Treatment type and duration varied extensively among our experimental subjects, and no attempt was made to control for either. It was not our intention to examine treatment effects on anxiety, nor did we reach any conclusions regarding treatment effects on our findings. However, we did note a nearly zero correlation (r = −0.013) between years of treatment and communication attitude as measured by the Erickson scale. Although we did not report on the relationship between years in treatment and anxiety, Craig’s comments encouraged us to examine these relationships. We obtained low correlations between years in treatment and both state (r = -0.139) and trait anxiety (r = −0.129). All we can, and did, conclude is that amount of treatment bears little relation to self-ratings of general or speech-specific anxiety.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access