Anxiety Levels in Persons Who Stutter: Comments on the Research of Miller and Watson (1992) Disease and disability are often associated with raised levels of persistent anxiety, and controlled research is necessary for a better understanding of this relationship (Craig, 1993). This is true for stuttering. But it is difficult to conduct research into the area of anxiety levels of persons who stutter. Most research ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   February 01, 1994
Anxiety Levels in Persons Who Stutter: Comments on the Research of Miller and Watson (1992) 
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ashley Craig
    University of Technology, Sydney Broadway, NSW, Australia
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   February 01, 1994
Anxiety Levels in Persons Who Stutter: Comments on the Research of Miller and Watson (1992) 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 90-92. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.90
History: Received March 25, 1993 , Accepted August 8, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 90-92. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.90
History: Received March 25, 1993; Accepted August 8, 1993
Disease and disability are often associated with raised levels of persistent anxiety, and controlled research is necessary for a better understanding of this relationship (Craig, 1993). This is true for stuttering. But it is difficult to conduct research into the area of anxiety levels of persons who stutter. Most research projects have employed small numbers of subjects, thereby increasing the risk of Type II errors and consequently failing to detect a true difference. Furthermore, few studies have employed an adequate sample size to guarantee representativeness (Craig, 1990, 1991). No studies are known to the author that have assessed anxiety levels from a large randomly selected community population. Miller and Watson (1992)  conducted research on differences in anxiety between persons who stutter and those who do not stutter. They also examined levels of depression and speech fears. They found no significant differences between the two groups on anxiety or depression and concluded that stuttering was not associated with raised anxiety levels. Unfortunately, their research cannot validly come to this conclusion for the following reasons:
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