Speech Production During Mechanical Ventilation in Tracheostomized Individuals This investigation provides the first detailed description of speech production during mechanical ventilation. Seven adults with tracheostomies served as subjects. Recordings were made of chest wall motions, neck muscle activity, tracheal pressure, air flow at the nose and mouth, estimated blood-gas levels, and the acoustic speech signal during performance of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1994
Speech Production During Mechanical Ventilation in Tracheostomized Individuals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Tucson, AZ
  • Steven A. Shea
    Harvard School of Public Health Boston, MA
  • Robert B. Banzett
    Harvard School of Public Health Boston, MA
  • Contact author: Jeannette D. Hoit, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1994
Speech Production During Mechanical Ventilation in Tracheostomized Individuals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 53-63. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.53
History: Received May 27, 1993 , Accepted August 30, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 53-63. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.53
History: Received May 27, 1993; Accepted August 30, 1993

This investigation provides the first detailed description of speech production during mechanical ventilation. Seven adults with tracheostomies served as subjects. Recordings were made of chest wall motions, neck muscle activity, tracheal pressure, air flow at the nose and mouth, estimated blood-gas levels, and the acoustic speech signal during performance of a variety of speech tasks. Results indicated that subjects spoke for short durations that spanned all phases of the ventilator cycle, altered laryngeal opposing pressures in response to the continually changing tracheal pressure wave, and expended relatively small volumes of gas for speech production. Speech was improved by making selected ventilator adjustments. Suggestions for clinical interventions are offered.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Clinical Investigator Development Award DC-00030 and National Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, and HL-19170 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood institute. S. Shea’s travel from the UK was kindly sponsored by the Wellcome Trust and the Commonwealth Fund. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of Robert Brown, Christine L. Jenks, Monica C. Pepitone, Lyn S. Turkstra, and Peter J. Watson. We extend a special thanks to the subjects who participated in this study.
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