Psychophysical Analysis of Audiovisual Judgments of Speech Naturalness of Nonstutterers and Stutterers The purpose of this study was to determine through psychophysical comparison of scaling data whether speech naturalness judgments of stutterers and nonstutterers from audiovisual recordings form a prothetic or a metathetic continuum. Comparison of direct magnitude estimation and equal-appearing interval scale data indicated that speech naturalness forms a metathetic continuum ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1994
Psychophysical Analysis of Audiovisual Judgments of Speech Naturalness of Nonstutterers and Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nicholas Schiavetti
    State University of New York Geneseo
  • Richard R. Martin
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Samuel K. Haroldson
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Dale Evan Metz
    State University of New York Geneseo
  • Contact author: Nicholas Schiavetti, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, 218 Sturges Hall, State University of New York, Geneseo, NY 14454.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1994
Psychophysical Analysis of Audiovisual Judgments of Speech Naturalness of Nonstutterers and Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 46-52. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.46
History: Received October 25, 1992 , Accepted August 20, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 46-52. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.46
History: Received October 25, 1992; Accepted August 20, 1993

The purpose of this study was to determine through psychophysical comparison of scaling data whether speech naturalness judgments of stutterers and nonstutterers from audiovisual recordings form a prothetic or a metathetic continuum. Comparison of direct magnitude estimation and equal-appearing interval scale data indicated that speech naturalness forms a metathetic continuum when observers judge audiovisual recordings, suggesting that either scaling procedure is valid for the quantification of this dimension. Ease of use, an existing body of comparative data from different clinics, and somewhat better reliability favor the interval scaling procedure.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by the Bryng Bryngelson Communication Disorders Research Fund, University of Minnesota.
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