An Investigation of Temporary Threshold Shift Caused by Hearing Aid Use Temporary threshold shift (TTS) caused by hearing aid use was measured by Bekesy audiometry in a group of individuals with severe sensorineural hearing loss. The accuracy with which a mathematical model consisting of the Modified Power Law (MPL) (Humes & Jesteadt, 1991) combined with equations for predicting TTS in normal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1994
An Investigation of Temporary Threshold Shift Caused by Hearing Aid Use
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John H. Macrae
    National Acoustic Laboratories Chatswood NSW, Australia
  • Contact author: John H. Macrae, PhD, National Acoustic Laboratories, 126 Greville Street, Chatswood NSW 2067, Australia.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1994
An Investigation of Temporary Threshold Shift Caused by Hearing Aid Use
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 227-237. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.227
History: Received January 29, 1993 , Accepted October 21, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 227-237. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.227
History: Received January 29, 1993; Accepted October 21, 1993

Temporary threshold shift (TTS) caused by hearing aid use was measured by Bekesy audiometry in a group of individuals with severe sensorineural hearing loss. The accuracy with which a mathematical model consisting of the Modified Power Law (MPL) (Humes & Jesteadt, 1991) combined with equations for predicting TTS in normal listeners (Mills, Gilbert, & Adkins, 1979) could predict the TTS was evaluated. When the exponent of the MPL was set to 0.15, the predicted TTS was significantly greater than the observed TTS at two out of six frequencies. When the exponent was increased to 0.20, there were no significant differences between the predictions and the observations. With this value of the exponent, the mathematical model was able to predict the observed TTS as accurately as it could be measured. The MPL was used to derive safety limits for TTS, and gain reduction was recommended as the best method of reducing TTS to the safety limits.

Acknowledgments
I would like to thank Pat Stelmachowicz, Walt Jesteadt, and Sandra Gordon-Salant for reviews that led to substantial improvements in this article.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access