Oral Communication Skills of Children Who Are Hard of Hearing Forty children with mild to severe hearing losses were administered a battery of speech and language tasks. The children’s speech was characterized by misarticulation of affricates and fricatives, mild-moderate hoarseness, mild resonance problems, and good intelligibility. Their language samples included syntactic errors, primarily involving the use of bound morphemes and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1994
Oral Communication Skills of Children Who Are Hard of Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jill L. Elfenbein
    University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Mary A. Hardin-Jones
    Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis
  • Julia M. Davis
    University of Minnesota Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Jill L. Elfenbein, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1994
Oral Communication Skills of Children Who Are Hard of Hearing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 216-226. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.216
History: Received February 3, 1993 , Accepted October 19, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 216-226. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.216
History: Received February 3, 1993; Accepted October 19, 1993

Forty children with mild to severe hearing losses were administered a battery of speech and language tasks. The children’s speech was characterized by misarticulation of affricates and fricatives, mild-moderate hoarseness, mild resonance problems, and good intelligibility. Their language samples included syntactic errors, primarily involving the use of bound morphemes and complex sentence structures. The children’s pragmatic errors consisted primarily of providing inadequate or ambiguous information to the listener. These results indicate a consistent pattern of oral communication behavior that reflects the reduction of acoustic input that they experience.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by Grant #G008000582 from the Department of Education, Special Education Program, and the Division of Personnel Preparation. The authors wish to thank Charissa Lansing and Edna Dixon for their assistance in collecting the data for this study.
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