Relationships Between Language and Gesture in Normally Developing and Late-Talking Toddlers Seventeen toddlers with specific expressive language delay (14 boys and 3 girls between 18 and 33 months of age) were compared to two control groups, one matched for language production and the other matched for age and language comprehension, on measures of spontaneous and imitated gesture production. Late talkers performed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1994
Relationships Between Language and Gesture in Normally Developing and Late-Talking Toddlers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donna Thai
    San Diego State University San Diego, CA
  • Stacy Tobias
    San Diego State University San Diego, CA
  • Contact author: Donna J. Thai, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, College of Health and Human Services, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-0151.
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1994
Relationships Between Language and Gesture in Normally Developing and Late-Talking Toddlers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 157-170. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.157
History: Received April 21, 1993 , Accepted September 8, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 157-170. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.157
History: Received April 21, 1993; Accepted September 8, 1993

Seventeen toddlers with specific expressive language delay (14 boys and 3 girls between 18 and 33 months of age) were compared to two control groups, one matched for language production and the other matched for age and language comprehension, on measures of spontaneous and imitated gesture production. Late talkers performed like age/comprehensionmatched controls on all experimental measures of gesture production and on production of later appearing, more symbolic gestures as reported by parents. Late talkers performed like language-matched controls on earlier appearing communicative gestures and gestural routines as reported by parents. All three groups produced more gestures in canonical imitation conditions than spontaneously. Results are discussed in the contexts of the Local Homology Model and characteristics of toddlers with specific expressive language delay.

Acknowledgments
We wish to thank Valerie McCaw, Denise Washkevich, Karen Schick, Claudia Copeland, Melinda Oroz, and Hilda Gomez for their help in transcribing and scoring the data. Special thanks go to the children and parents who participated in this study. Without their help the work could not have been completed. This research was supported by grant number DC00482 from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communicative Disorders.
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