Nonlinear Phonology Introduction and Clinical Application Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1994
Nonlinear Phonology
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara Bernhardt
    University of British Columbia Vancouver
  • Carol Stoel-Gammon
    University of Washington Seattle
  • Contact author: Carol Stoel-Gammon, PhD, Dept. of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, JG-15, Seattle, WA 98195. E-mail: csg@u.washington.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1994
Nonlinear Phonology
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 123-143. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.123
History: Received October 21, 1992 , Accepted August 11, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1994, Vol. 37, 123-143. doi:10.1044/jshr.3701.123
History: Received October 21, 1992; Accepted August 11, 1993

The purpose of this tutorial is to introduce a recent advance in phonological theory, “nonlinear phonology,” which differs fundamentally from previous theories by focusing on the hierarchical nature of relationships among phonological units. We first introduce the basic concepts and assumptions of nonlinear phonological theory and then demonstrate clinical applications of the theory for assessment and intervention. Data from a child with a severe phonological disorder are used to illustrate aspects of nonlinear theory. The data are first analyzed in terms of phonological processes in order to provide the readers with a familiar starting point for comprehension and comparison. The nonlinear frameworks are shown to provide a deeper analysis of the child’s phonological system than the phonological process analyses and to lead to a more clearly defined intervention plan.

Acknowledgments
We would like to acknowledge the data source for this tutorial: Normal and Disordered Phonology in Children by C. Stoel-Gammon and C. Dunn (1985), published by PRO-ED (Austin, TX). For commentary on the manuscript, we thank Margaret Kehoe of the University of Washington, Joseph Paul Stemberger of the University of Minnesota, and the reviewers for this journal.
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