Monaural Envelope Correlation Perception in Listeners With Normal Hearing and Cochlear Impairment Monaural envelope correlation perception was investigated in listeners with normal hearing and in listeners with cochlear hearing loss. Using a three-interval forced-choice procedure, the task of the subject was to identify the one interval out of three where the noise bands had correlated envelopes. Performance was determined as a function ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1993
Monaural Envelope Correlation Perception in Listeners With Normal Hearing and Cochlear Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph W. Hall, III
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • John H. Grose
    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: Joseph W. Hall III, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Division of Otolaryngology, 610 Burnett-Womack Building, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7070.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1993
Monaural Envelope Correlation Perception in Listeners With Normal Hearing and Cochlear Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1993, Vol. 36, 1306-1314. doi:10.1044/jshr.3606.1306
History: Received December 4, 1992 , Accepted June 10, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1993, Vol. 36, 1306-1314. doi:10.1044/jshr.3606.1306
History: Received December 4, 1992; Accepted June 10, 1993

Monaural envelope correlation perception was investigated in listeners with normal hearing and in listeners with cochlear hearing loss. Using a three-interval forced-choice procedure, the task of the subject was to identify the one interval out of three where the noise bands had correlated envelopes. Performance was determined as a function of the spectral separation between noise bands (Δf of 250, 500, or 1000 Hz) and the number of noise bands present (two, three, or five). Although individual differences existed, the results generally indicated better performance for the listeners with normal hearing when the Δf between bands was relatively small; however, there was no significant effect of hearing loss when the frequency separation between bands was greater than 250 Hz. The listeners with normal hearing generally showed decreased performance with increasing Δf, whereas the performance of many of the listeners with hearing impairment usually did not change appreciably with variation in Δf. Both groups of listeners showed improved performance with increasing number of noise bands present for the 500-Hz Δf. Only the listeners with hearing impairment showed significantly improved performance with increasing band number for the 250-Hz Δf; neither group showed improved performance with increasing band number for the 1000-Hz Δf. With five bands present, the performance of the listeners with hearing impairment did not differ significantly from that of the listeners with normal hearing, even for the 250-Hz Δf. It is possible that the poor performance of many of the listeners with hearing impairment when Δf is small may be due to relatively poor peripheral frequency analysis. It is difficult to determine the role of within-channel versus across-channel cues in the effects obtained.

Acknowledgments
We thank Debora Hatch and Bruce Arne for help in data collection and statistical analysis. We thank Lee Mendoza for helpful discussions. This research was supported by a grant from NIH (R01 DC00418 from NIH NIDCD). Two anonymous reviewers provided helpful comments.
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