A Response to Van Lancker and Sidtis (1992) A failure to replicate has important implications and may be related to several factors. A failure to replicate may be related to statistical errors either in the original study or in the replication. More commonly, however, failure to replicate is related to methodological factors. In the article, “The Identification of ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   December 01, 1993
A Response to Van Lancker and Sidtis (1992)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth M. Heilman
    University of Florida College of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, FL
Article Information
Special Populations / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   December 01, 1993
A Response to Van Lancker and Sidtis (1992)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1993, Vol. 36, 1191. doi:10.1044/jshr.3606.1191a
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1993, Vol. 36, 1191. doi:10.1044/jshr.3606.1191a
A failure to replicate has important implications and may be related to several factors. A failure to replicate may be related to statistical errors either in the original study or in the replication. More commonly, however, failure to replicate is related to methodological factors. In the article, “The Identification of Affective-Prosodic Stimuli by Left- and Right- Hemisphere-Damaged Subjects: All Errors Are Not Created Equal″ Van Lancker and Sidtis (1992) failed to replicate earlier studies, which suggested that, when compared to left-hemisphere controls, right-hemisphere-damaged subjects were impaired in comprehending emotionally intoned prosody (Heilman, Scholes, & Watson, 1975; Tucker, Watson, & Heilman, 1977; Heilman, Bowers, Speedie, & Coslett, 1984; Ehlers & Dalby, 1987; Tompkins & Mateer, 1985).
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