Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering Systematic Replication of Ingham, Cordes, and Gow (1993) Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1993
Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Anne K. Cordes
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Patrick Finn
    University of New Mexico
  • Contact author: Roger J. Ingham, Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-7050.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1993
Time-Interval Measurement of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1993, Vol. 36, 1168-1176. doi:10.1044/jshr.3606.1168
History: Received January 2, 1993 , Accepted July 2, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1993, Vol. 36, 1168-1176. doi:10.1044/jshr.3606.1168
History: Received January 2, 1993; Accepted July 2, 1993

The study reported in this paper was designed to replicate and extend the results of an earlier study (Ingham, Cordes, & Gow, 1993) that investigated time-interval judgments of stuttering. Results confirmed earlier findings that interjudge agreement is higher for these interval-recording tasks than has been previously reported for event-based analyses of stuttering judgments or for time-interval analyses of event judgments. Results also confirmed an earlier finding that judges with intrajudge agreement levels of 90% or better show higher interjudge agreement than judges with lower intrajudge agreement scores. This study failed to find differences between audiovisual and audio-only judgment conditions; between relatively experienced and relatively inexperienced student judges; and, most importantly, between the judgments made, and the agreement levels achieved, by judges from two different clinical research settings. The implications of these findings for attempts to develop a reliable measurement method for stuttering are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Authorship of this paper is considered equal between the first two authors. All three authors express their appreciation to the students who served as judges for this study; to Richard Moglia, who provided technical support; and to Peter Frank, who developed the software for isolating intervals of speech from the laser disks. Some of the speech samples used in this study were obtained with assistance from Deborah Kully, Julia Boberg, Einer Boberg, and Richard Martin. This research was supported by grant #DC00060 awarded to the first author by the National Institutes of Health.
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