Factorial Temperament Structure in Stuttering, Voice-Disordered, and Typically Developing Children PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine whether the underlying temperamental structure of the Dutch Children’s Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ; B. Van den Bergh & M. Ackx, 2003) was identical for children who stutter (CWS), typically developing children (TDC), and children with vocal nodules (CWVN).MethodA principal axis factor analysis was ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2009
Factorial Temperament Structure in Stuttering, Voice-Disordered, and Typically Developing Children
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Kurt Eggers, Department of Speech and Language Therapy and Audiology, Lessius University College, Sanderusstraat 45 Antwerp 2018, Belgium. E-mail: kurt.eggers@lessius.eu.
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   December 01, 2009
Factorial Temperament Structure in Stuttering, Voice-Disordered, and Typically Developing Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2009, Vol. 52, 1610-1622. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0065)
History: Received March 15, 2007 , Accepted February 11, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2009, Vol. 52, 1610-1622. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0065)
History: Received March 15, 2007; Accepted February 11, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine whether the underlying temperamental structure of the Dutch Children’s Behavior Questionnaire (CBQ; B. Van den Bergh & M. Ackx, 2003) was identical for children who stutter (CWS), typically developing children (TDC), and children with vocal nodules (CWVN).

MethodA principal axis factor analysis was performed on data obtained with the Dutch CBQ from 69 CWS, 149 TDC, and 41 CWVN. All children were between the ages of 3;0 (years;months) and 8;11.

ResultsResults indicated a 3-factor solution, identified as Extraversion/Surgency, Negative Affect, and Effortful Control, for each of the participant groups, showing considerable similarity to previously published U.S., Chinese, Japanese, and Dutch samples. Congruence coefficients were highest for CWS and TDC and somewhat more modest when comparing CWVN and TDC. The Effortful Control factor consistently yielded the lowest congruence coefficients.

ConclusionThese data confirm that although stuttering, voice-disordered, and typically developing children may differ quantitatively with regard to mean scores on temperament scales, they are similar in terms of their overall underlying temperament structure. The equivalence of temperament structure provides a basis for further comparison of mean group scores on the individual temperament scales.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Lessius University College. We would like to thank all the families, schools, and fluency specialists who participated in this study. We are also grateful to students Karolien Gebruers and Sofie Mangelschots for their assistance with processing some of the questionnaire data.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access