Mandibular Motor Control During the Early Development of Speech and Nonspeech Behaviors PurposeThe mandible is often portrayed as a primary structure of early babble production, but empiricists still need to specify (a) how mandibular motor control and kinematics vary among different types of multisyllabic babble, (b) whether chewing or jaw oscillation relies on a coordinative infrastructure that can be exploited for early ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2009
Mandibular Motor Control During the Early Development of Speech and Nonspeech Behaviors
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Roger W. Steeve, University of Wyoming, Division of Communication Disorders, Department 3311, 1000 East University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071. E-mail: rsteeve@uwyo.edu.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   December 01, 2009
Mandibular Motor Control During the Early Development of Speech and Nonspeech Behaviors
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2009, Vol. 52, 1530-1554. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0020)
History: Received January 24, 2008 , Accepted February 6, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2009, Vol. 52, 1530-1554. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0020)
History: Received January 24, 2008; Accepted February 6, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

PurposeThe mandible is often portrayed as a primary structure of early babble production, but empiricists still need to specify (a) how mandibular motor control and kinematics vary among different types of multisyllabic babble, (b) whether chewing or jaw oscillation relies on a coordinative infrastructure that can be exploited for early types of multisyllables, and (c) whether the organization of motor control and associated kinematics varies across the nonspeech behaviors that are candidate motor stereotypies for speech.

MethodElectromyographic signals were obtained from mandibular muscle groups, and associated kinematics were measured longitudinally from a typically developing infant from 9 to 22 months during jaw oscillation, chewing, and several types of early multisyllabic babble.

ResultsMeasures of early motor control and mandibular kinematics for multisyllabic productions indicated task-dependent changes across syllable types and significant differences across babble and nonspeech behaviors. Differences in motor control were also observed across nonspeech behaviors.

ConclusionsMotor control for babble appears to be influenced by the balanced interaction between developing motor and linguistic systems, such that variation in linguistic complexity systematically evinces changes in motor organization apparently to meet these demands. This same effect was noted among chewing and jaw oscillation; task-dependent changes in mandibular control were noted across behaviors.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by the National Institutes of Health Idea Network of Biomedical Research Excellence Program (INBRE), National Center for Research Resources Grant P20 RR16474 as well as by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants R01 DC00822, T32 DC00033, and F31 DC00295; the University of Wyoming in Laramie; and the University of Washington in Seattle. We would like to acknowledge Katey Connaghan, Lakshmi Venkatesh, Jennell Vick, and Adam Politis for their assistance with data collection and analysis.
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