A Nonword Repetition Task for Speakers With Misarticulations: The Syllable Repetition Task (SRT) PurposeConceptual and methodological confounds occur when non(sense) word repetition tasks are administered to speakers who do not have the target speech sounds in their phonetic inventories or who habitually misarticulate targeted speech sounds. In this article, the authors (a) describe a nonword repetition task, the Syllable Repetiton Task (SRT), that ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2009
A Nonword Repetition Task for Speakers With Misarticulations: The Syllable Repetition Task (SRT)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence D. Shriberg
    Waisman Center, Madison, WI
  • Heather L. Lohmeier
    Waisman Center, Madison, WI
  • Thomas F. Campbell
    The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Christine A. Dollaghan
    The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Jordan R. Green
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Christopher A. Moore
    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD
  • Contact author: Lawrence D. Shriberg, Room 439, Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705. E-mail: shriberg@waisman.wisc.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Article   |   October 01, 2009
A Nonword Repetition Task for Speakers With Misarticulations: The Syllable Repetition Task (SRT)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2009, Vol. 52, 1189-1212. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0047)
History: Received February 27, 2008 , Revised August 7, 2008 , Accepted February 20, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2009, Vol. 52, 1189-1212. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0047)
History: Received February 27, 2008; Revised August 7, 2008; Accepted February 20, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 33

PurposeConceptual and methodological confounds occur when non(sense) word repetition tasks are administered to speakers who do not have the target speech sounds in their phonetic inventories or who habitually misarticulate targeted speech sounds. In this article, the authors (a) describe a nonword repetition task, the Syllable Repetiton Task (SRT), that eliminates this confound and (b) report findings from 3 validity studies.

MethodNinety-five preschool children with speech delay and 63 with typical speech completed an assessment battery that included the Nonword Repetition Task (NRT; C. Dollaghan & T. F. Campbell, 1998) and the SRT. SRT stimuli include only 4 of the earliest occurring consonants and 1 early occurring vowel.

ResultsStudy 1 findings indicated that the SRT eliminated the speech confound in nonword testing with speakers who misarticulate. Study 2 findings indicated that the accuracy of the SRT to identify expressive language impairment was comparable to findings for the NRT. Study 3 findings illustrated the SRT’s potential to interrogate speech processing constraints underlying poor nonword repetition accuracy. Results supported both memorial and auditory–perceptual encoding constraints underlying nonword repetition errors in children with speech-language impairment.

ConclusionThe SRT appears to be a psychometrically stable and substantively informative nonword repetition task for emerging genetic research and other research with speakers who misarticulate.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants DC00496 and DC00822 and by core grants to the Waisman Center from the National Institute of Child Health and Development (Grant HD03352) and the General Clinical Research Center at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh (Grant M01RR00084). We thank Joan Kwiatkowski, Jane McSweeny, and Steven Pittelko for their significant contributions to the development of the SRT. We also thank the following colleagues for their assistance with the design and completion of the physiology study and data analysis for the present study: Roger Brown, Christine Hollar, Heather Leavy Rusiewicz, Christie Tilkens, Sonja Wilson, and David Wilson.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access