Effects of It Takes Two to Talk—The Hanen Program for Parents of Preschool Children With Cerebral Palsy: Findings From an Exploratory Study PurposeTo investigate whether It Takes Two to Talk—The Hanen Program for Parents of Preschool Children With Cerebral Palsy is associated with change in interaction between children who have motor disorders and their parents.MethodEleven children aged 19–36 months who had nonprogressive motor disorders that affected their communication, and their mothers, were ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2009
Effects of It Takes Two to Talk—The Hanen Program for Parents of Preschool Children With Cerebral Palsy: Findings From an Exploratory Study
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Lindsay Pennington, Newcastle University–Clinical Medical Sciences (Child Health), Sir James Spence Institute Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 4LP, United Kingdom. E-mail: lindsay.pennington@ncl.ac.uk.
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Language
Article   |   October 01, 2009
Effects of It Takes Two to Talk—The Hanen Program for Parents of Preschool Children With Cerebral Palsy: Findings From an Exploratory Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2009, Vol. 52, 1121-1138. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0187)
History: Received August 12, 2007 , Revised February 15, 2008 , Accepted January 14, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2009, Vol. 52, 1121-1138. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0187)
History: Received August 12, 2007; Revised February 15, 2008; Accepted January 14, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 19

PurposeTo investigate whether It Takes Two to Talk—The Hanen Program for Parents of Preschool Children With Cerebral Palsy is associated with change in interaction between children who have motor disorders and their parents.

MethodEleven children aged 19–36 months who had nonprogressive motor disorders that affected their communication, and their mothers, were observed 4 months and 1 month before mothers attended It Takes Two to Talk training, and 1 month and 4 months after its completion.

ResultsInteraction patterns were stable prior to training. After training, mothers initiated less and produced more responses and fewer requests. Children produced more initiations, as well as more requests and provisions of information, after training. Mothers' linguistic input did not change in amount or complexity. Changes were maintained 4 months later. Mothers' views of parenting did not change.

ConclusionsIt Takes Two to Talk may be associated with positive communication change for this group. Further investigation of its clinical effectiveness is warranted.

Acknowledgments
The first author was supported by the Health Foundation and the U.K. Department of Health National Health Service Research and Development Programme during this research. The study was funded by The Health Foundation, London United Kingdom.
We extend thanks to all families in England and Australia who took part in the study and to the therapists in the United Kingdom and in Novita Children’s Services, South Australia, who recruited the families and provided the intervention in this study. We also thank Thomas Klee and Helen McConachie for their helpful comments on a draft of this article.
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