In Memoriam: Thomas J. Hixon, PhD The editors of JSLHR have elected to take this opportunity to publish an In Memoriam piece for Dr. Thomas J. Hixon, who was the Editor of the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research from 1974 to 1978 and Editor of the Speech section of the Journal of Speech, Language, ... Editorial
Editorial  |   August 01, 2009
In Memoriam: Thomas J. Hixon, PhD
 
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Professional Issues & Training / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Editorial   |   August 01, 2009
In Memoriam: Thomas J. Hixon, PhD
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2009, Vol. 52, 826. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/im0713)
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2009, Vol. 52, 826. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/im0713)
The editors of JSLHR have elected to take this opportunity to publish an In Memoriam piece for Dr. Thomas J. Hixon, who was the Editor of the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research from 1974 to 1978 and Editor of the Speech section of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research from 2002 to 2005. We wish to acknowledge Dr. Hixon’s contributions to this journal and to the ASHA Journals Program as a whole. This In Memoriam was written and submitted by Dr. Ray Kent, University of Wisconsin–Madison.
Thomas J. Hixon, 69, passed away on March 21, 2009, in Tucson, Arizona. The scope and depth of his professional accomplishments are extraordinary. Hixon was a pre-eminent scientist in speech physiology, an award-winning teacher, an inspiring mentor, an uncompromising journal editor, a forward-looking university administrator, a respected expert witness in forensic science, and a visionary advocate of affirmative action. He received his Bachelor of Science from Bloomsburg University in Pennsylvania and his Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Iowa. His postdoctoral work in physiology at Harvard University, mentored by the renowned Jere Mead, had a galvanizing influence on Hixon’s research, which substantially shaped the contemporary understanding of normal speech production, neurogenic speech disorders, and singing. Hixon’s academic career was divided between the University of Wisconsin–Madison (1965–1976) and the University of Arizona (1976 until his death). At the University of Arizona, he served in a number of administrative positions, including head of the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Dean of the Graduate College, Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies, Research Integrity Officer, and Director of Graduate Interdisciplinary Programs. His research set new standards in laboratory methods, systematized procedures of clinical assessment and intervention, and introduced powerful perspectives on respiratory function in speech and voice. Tom Hixon led by example. His legacy includes exemplary scholarship; innovative research; groundbreaking scientific publications; commitment to graduate education; and a warm, positive influence on students, colleagues, and friends. He received numerous awards for his work, culminating in the Kawana Award in 2007, given by the Council of Editors of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) in recognition of sustained scientific contributions. An exacting and disciplined writer, he authored more than 100 publications, including seminal research articles, authoritative book chapters, and field-leading books. He served as Editor of the Journal of Speech and Hearing Research (1974–1978) and as Editor of the Speech Section of the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (2002–2005). Hixon was elected an ASHA Fellow in 1977 and received the ASHA Honors in 1995. He is survived by his wife and scientific collaborator, Jeannette Hoit, and his children, Todd and Kimberly.
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