Comparison of Acoustic and Kinematic Approaches to Measuring Utterance-Level Speech Variability PurposeThe spatiotemporal index (STI) is one measure of variability. As currently implemented, kinematic data are used, requiring equipment that cannot be used with some patient groups or in scanners. An experiment is reported that addressed whether STI can be extended to an audio measure of sound pressure of the speech ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 2009
Comparison of Acoustic and Kinematic Approaches to Measuring Utterance-Level Speech Variability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peter Howell
    University College London
  • Andrew J. Anderson
    University College London
  • Jon Bartrip
    University College London
  • Eleanor Bailey
    University College London
  • Contact author: Peter Howell, Department of Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, England. E-mail: p.howell@ucl.ac.uk.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Research Note   |   August 01, 2009
Comparison of Acoustic and Kinematic Approaches to Measuring Utterance-Level Speech Variability
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2009, Vol. 52, 1088-1096. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0167)
History: Received July 13, 2007 , Revised March 3, 2008 , Accepted November 6, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2009, Vol. 52, 1088-1096. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0167)
History: Received July 13, 2007; Revised March 3, 2008; Accepted November 6, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

PurposeThe spatiotemporal index (STI) is one measure of variability. As currently implemented, kinematic data are used, requiring equipment that cannot be used with some patient groups or in scanners. An experiment is reported that addressed whether STI can be extended to an audio measure of sound pressure of the speech envelope over time that did not need specialized equipment.

MethodSTI indices of variability were obtained from lip track (L-STI) and amplitude envelope (E-STI) signals. These measures were made concurrent while either fluent speakers or speakers who stutter repeated “Buy Bobby a puppy” 20 times.

ResultsL-STI and E-STI correlated significantly. STI decreased with age for both L-STI and E-STI. E-STI scores and L-STI scores discriminated successfully between fluent speakers and speakers who stutter.

ConclusionThe amplitude-envelope-over-time signal can be used to obtain an STI score. This STI score can be used in situations where lip movement STI scores are precluded.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by Wellcome Trust Grant 072639 awarded to Peter Howell.
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