Research Note  |   June 2009
Modulation of Frontal Lobe Speech Areas Associated With the Production and Perception of Speech Movements
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dana Moser
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Jack Ryalls
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Leonardo Bonilha
    University of South Carolina
  • Contact author: Dana Moser, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Carolina, Williams-Brice Nursing Building, 6th Floor, 1621 Greene Street, Columbia, SC 29280. E-mail: moserd@gwm.sc.edu.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Research Note   |   June 2009
Modulation of Frontal Lobe Speech Areas Associated With the Production and Perception of Speech Movements
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 812-819. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/06-0197)
History: Received October 25, 2006 , Revised November 26, 2007 , Accepted September 2, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 812-819. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/06-0197)
History: Received October 25, 2006; Revised November 26, 2007; Accepted September 2, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

Purpose: It is unclear whether the production and perception of speech movements are subserved by the same brain networks. The purpose of this study was to investigate neural recruitment in cortical areas commonly associated with speech production during the production and visual perception of speech.

Method: This study utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess brain function while participants either imitated or observed speech movements.

Results: A common neural network was recruited by both tasks. The greatest frontal lobe activity in Broca’s area was triggered not only when producing speech but also when watching speech movements. Relatively less activity was observed in the left anterior insula during both tasks.

Conclusion: These results support the emerging view that cortical areas involved in the execution of speech movements are also recruited in the perception of the same movements in other speakers.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by Grants R03-005915 and R01-DC008355 to Julius Fridriksson from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and Grant R01-042047 to Gordon Baylis from the National Institute on Neurological Disorders and Stroke.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access