Establishing a New Animal Model for the Study of Laryngeal Biology and Disease: An Anatomic Study of the Mouse Larynx Purpose Animal models have contributed greatly to the study of voice, permitting the examination of laryngeal biology and the testing of surgical, medical, and behavioral interventions. Various models have been used. However, until recently, the mouse (Mus musculus) has not been used in laryngeal research, and features of the mouse ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 2009
Establishing a New Animal Model for the Study of Laryngeal Biology and Disease: An Anatomic Study of the Mouse Larynx
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa B. Thomas
    Marshall University, Huntington, WV
  • Joseph C. Stemple
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Richard D. Andreatta
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Francisco H. Andrade
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Contact author: Lisa B. Thomas, Department of Communication Disorders, Marshall University, 1 John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25755. E-mail: thomasl@marshall.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 01, 2009
Establishing a New Animal Model for the Study of Laryngeal Biology and Disease: An Anatomic Study of the Mouse Larynx
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 802-811. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/08-0087)
History: Received April 24, 2008 , Accepted August 18, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 802-811. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/08-0087)
History: Received April 24, 2008; Accepted August 18, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

Purpose Animal models have contributed greatly to the study of voice, permitting the examination of laryngeal biology and the testing of surgical, medical, and behavioral interventions. Various models have been used. However, until recently, the mouse (Mus musculus) has not been used in laryngeal research, and features of the mouse larynx have not been defined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to qualitatively describe mouse laryngeal anatomy in relation to known human anatomy.

Methods Larynges of 7 C57BL mice were examined and photographed under stereotactic and light microscopy.

Results The authors found that mouse laryngeal organization was similar to that of humans. The hyoid bone and epiglottal, thyroid, cricoid, and arytenoid cartilages were identified. An additional cartilage was present ventrally. Thyroarytenoid, posterior cricoarytenoid, lateral cricoarytenoid, and cricothyroid muscles were grossly positioned as in humans. Interarytenoid muscles were not present; however, a functional counterpart was identified.

Conclusions The authors provide an initial description of mouse laryngeal anatomy. Because of its amenability to genetic engineering, the mouse is the premiere model for the study of disease and the testing of interventions. Introduction of the mouse model for laryngeal study offers a tool for the study of normal laryngeal cell biology and tissue response to disease processes.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank Tom Dolan, medical illustrator at the University of Kentucky, for his work in creating the graphic images displayed in this article.
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