Article/Report  |   June 2009
Voice Onset Time Characteristics of Esophageal, Tracheoesophageal, and Laryngeal Speech of Cantonese
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Manwa L. Ng
    The University of Hong Kong
  • Juliana Wong
    The University of Hong Kong
  • Contact author: Manwa L. Ng, Speech Science Laboratory, Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, 5/F Prince Philip Dental Hospital, 34 Hospital Road, Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong, SAR, China. E-mail: mng.work@gmail.com.
  • © 2009 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article/Report   |   June 2009
Voice Onset Time Characteristics of Esophageal, Tracheoesophageal, and Laryngeal Speech of Cantonese
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 780-789. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0182)
History: Received August 5, 2007 , Revised March 14, 2008 , Accepted September 8, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 780-789. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0182)
History: Received August 5, 2007; Revised March 14, 2008; Accepted September 8, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Purpose: To investigate the ability of standard esophageal (SE) and tracheoesophageal (TE) speakers of Cantonese to differentiate between aspirated and unaspirated stops produced at 3 places of articulation were investigated.

Method: Six Cantonese stops, /p, t, k, ph, th, kh/, followed by the vowel /a/ produced by 10 SE, TE, and normal laryngeal (NL) speakers were examined through perceptual tasks and voice onset time (VOT) analysis.

Results: Perceptual experiments showed lower accuracy of identification of stops produced by SE and TE than by NL speakers, with mostly misidentification of aspirated stops as their unaspirated counterparts. Acoustic analysis revealed that aspirated stops produced by NL, SE, and TE speakers were associated with significantly longer VOT values than their unaspirated counterparts. Unaspirated velar stops showed significantly longer VOT than bilabial and alveolar stops in NL and SE speech. SE and TE speakers were still able to use VOT to signal aspiration contrast, but TE was unable to differentiate among different places of articulation.

Acknowledgments
We would like to express our gratitude to the New Voice Club of Hong Kong for their help in the data collection process. We are also thankful to all participants in the reading and listening experiments.
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