Does Language Influence the Accuracy of Judgments of Stuttering in Children? Purpose To determine whether stuttering judgment accuracy is influenced by familiarity with the stuttering speaker’s language. Method Audiovisual 7-min speech samples from nine 3- to 5-year-olds were used. Icelandic children who stutter (CWS), preselected for different levels of stuttering, were subdivided into 5-s intervals. Ten experienced Icelandic speech-language ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2009
Does Language Influence the Accuracy of Judgments of Stuttering in Children?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jóhanna Einarsdóttir
    University of Iceland
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Contact author: Jóhanna Einarsdóttir, University of Iceland, School of Education, Bolholt 6, 105 Reykjavík, Iceland. E-mail: jeinars@hi.is.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2009
Does Language Influence the Accuracy of Judgments of Stuttering in Children?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 766-779. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0248)
History: Received November 7, 2007 , Accepted September 5, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2009, Vol. 52, 766-779. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/07-0248)
History: Received November 7, 2007; Accepted September 5, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose To determine whether stuttering judgment accuracy is influenced by familiarity with the stuttering speaker’s language.

Method Audiovisual 7-min speech samples from nine 3- to 5-year-olds were used. Icelandic children who stutter (CWS), preselected for different levels of stuttering, were subdivided into 5-s intervals. Ten experienced Icelandic speech-language pathologists (ICE-SLPs) and 10 experienced U.S. speech-language pathologists (US-SLPs), the latter being unfamiliar with the Icelandic language, independently judged each 5-s interval (n = 756) as stuttered or nonstuttered on 2 separate occasions.

Results As in previous studies, intervals judged to contain stuttering showed wide variability within the ICE-SLP and US-SLP groups. However, both SLP groups (a) displayed satisfactory mean intrajudge agreement, (b) met an independent stuttering judgment accuracy criterion test using English-speaking CWS samples, and (c) met an agreement criterion on approximately 90% of their stuttering and nonstuttering judgments on the Icelandic-speaking CWS samples.

Conclusion Experienced SLPs were shown to be highly accurate in recognizing stuttering and nonstuttering exemplars from young CWS speaking in an unfamiliar language. The findings suggest that judgments of occurrences of stuttering in CWS are not generally language dependent, although some exceptions were noted.

Acknowledgments
This article was prepared as part of the requirements for the first author’s doctoral program at the University of Iceland. This work was supported by the University Eimskipafélag Fund, Graduate Research Fund of The Icelandic Centre for Research, Educational Grant of Landsbanki íslands, Reykjavík Educational Fund, Oddur ólafsson Grant, and Málbjörg (the Icelandic Stuttering Association). Special thanks are offered to the Icelandic and the U.S. speech-language pathologists and to the children and parents who participated in this study. Additional thanks are due to John Cotton at the University of California, Santa Barbara, for conducting additional cross-analyses of the results data.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access